25 January 2022
Live since
Yes
KYC required
$50,000
Maximum bounty

Program Overview

Maple Finance is an institutional capital marketplace powered by blockchain technology. On a mission to redefine capital markets through digital assets, Maple expands the digital economy by providing undercollateralized lending for institutional borrowers and fixed-income opportunities for lenders. The economic potential of the future will be fulfilled by harnessing global capital and applying it to areas of greatest opportunity.

Maple offers borrowers transparent and efficient financing completed entirely on-chain. For lenders, Maple offers a sustainable yield source through lending to diversified pools of crypto’s premium institutions. The Pool Delegates that manage these pools perform diligence and set terms with Borrowers.

The protocol is governed by the Maple Token (MPL), which enables token holders to participate in governance, share in fee revenues, and stake insurance to Lending Pools.

For more information about Maple, please visit https://www.maple.finance/.
This bug bounty program is focused on their smart contracts and is focused on preventing:

  • Thefts and freezing of principal of any amount
  • Thefts and freezing of unclaimed yield of any amount
  • Thefts and freezing of any collateral
  • Unintended changes in smart contract permissioning
  • Unintended changes in proxy/upgradeability functionality
  • Unfair liquidations of collateral

Rewards by Threat Level

Rewards are distributed according to the impact of the vulnerability based on the Immunefi Vulnerability Severity Classification System. This is a simplified 5-level scale, with separate scales for websites/apps and smart contracts/blockchains, encompassing everything from consequence of exploitation to privilege required to likelihood of a successful exploit.

All bug reports must come with a PoC with an end-effect impacting an asset-in-scope in order to be considered for a reward.

All known issues highlighted in the following audit report are considered to be out-of-scope:

Maple requires KYC to be done for all bug bounty hunters submitting a report and wanting a reward. The information needed is a government issued photo ID as well as a proof of address issued within the last 3 months (eg. utility bill).

Payouts are handled by the Maple team directly and are denominated in USD. However, payouts are done in USDC or MPL.

Smart Contract

Critical
Level
USD $50,000
Payout
PoC Required
High
Level
USD $25,000
Payout
PoC Required
Medium
Level
USD $1,000
Payout
PoC Required

Assets in scope

All proxies deployed from the listed factories are also considered as in-scope.

All smart contracts of Maple can be found at https://github.com/maple-labs/. However, only those in the Assets in Scope table are considered as in-scope of the bug bounty program.

Impacts in scope

Only the following impacts are accepted within this bug bounty program. All other impacts are not considered as in-scope, even if they affect something in the assets in scope table.

Smart Contract

  • Thefts and freezing of principal of any amount
    Critical
    Impact
  • Thefts and freezing of any collateral
    Critical
    Impact
  • Thefts and freezing of unclaimed yield of any amount
    High
    Impact

Out of Scope & Rules

The following vulnerabilities are excluded from the rewards for this bug bounty program:

  • Attacks that the reporter has already exploited themselves, leading to damage
  • Attacks requiring access to leaked keys/credentials
  • Attacks requiring access to privileged addresses (governance, strategist)

Smart Contracts and Blockchain

  • Incorrect data supplied by third party oracles
    • Not to exclude oracle manipulation/flash loan attacks
  • Basic economic governance attacks (e.g. 51% attack)
  • Lack of liquidity
  • Best practice critiques
  • Sybil attacks
  • Centralization risks

The following activities are prohibited by this bug bounty program:

  • Any testing with mainnet or public testnet contracts; all testing should be done on private testnets
  • Any testing with pricing oracles or third party smart contracts
  • Attempting phishing or other social engineering attacks against our employees and/or customers
  • Any testing with third party systems and applications (e.g. browser extensions) as well as websites (e.g. SSO providers, advertising networks)
  • Any denial of service attacks
  • Automated testing of services that generates significant amounts of traffic
  • Public disclosure of an unpatched vulnerability in an embargoed bounty